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metric screws and nuts

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25件のコメント

  • Tim Heeney

    Hi Jes.

    This company has 3D models in .step format ( and many many other formats!) for metric fasteners.

    ' https://www.trfastenings.com/products/Catalogue/Screws-and-Bolts/Hexagon-Screws-and-Bolts/Bolts/TR00002827-100 '

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  • Jacant

    The step files on the link 'Tim' gave do not have the thread as part of the model..

    McMaster-Carr do have the full threaded nut and bolt.

    Just look a bit closer to change to 'Metric'

     

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  • Buk

    If you cannot find an M42 model, look for an M14 model and scale it.

    Eg. an M14x1.5 *3.0 gives you an M42x4.5; or M14x1 * 3 gives M42x3...

    M39 is tougher as there aren't many (any?) M13 models around.

    ISO designates M39x(4|3|2|1.5|1).

    The only other divisor of 39 (besides 13) is 3.

    ISO designates M3 x (0.5|0.35). None of those scaled by 13 to get the diameter, will give you an acceptable thread pitch.

    You could consider scaling twice; once in one dimension, and the second time in another, but it is probably quicker to create your own from scratch, than work out the math of the two transformations.

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  • Jes Consuegra

    Hi Tim, Jacant and Buk.

    Thanks a lot for so much information!.

    I've been watching carefully all the sources, they are a nice starting point.

    I forgot to mention I need the finer threading, (M42x1mm and M39x1mm) used in photography lenses.

    In the meantime I've found a couple of Youtube tutorials on how to create a M16 thread from scratch for DS Mechanical:

    https://youtu.be/oHBrsZHBGkU   

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyLPuvF_MVg

    for the case anyone else would need them.

    Thanks again for such a complete and useful information!.

    Now going to battle against DS Mech...

     

     

     

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  • Tim Heeney

    Hi Jes.

    Not that i enjoy swimming against the tide, but i question the need to model up all the thread information ?

    Do you really need to go cutting threads on all your parts?

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  • Jes Consuegra

    Hi Tim,

    Thanks so much for your nice suggestion.

    Unfortunately I don't do any machining at all. I am on 3D printing adapters for old lenses to adapt to modern digital cameras. (Usually one of a kind). So I need the full detail of every object because they will be printed straight from the CAD output.

    I do not discard the possibility of doing some of them made in metal in the workshop, if there is any request for that. In that case I'll take your trick into account.

    Thanks again.

    Jes.

     

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  • Tim Heeney

    Hi Jes - thanks for explaining...

    Gotta say i'm at a loss of understanding how a 3D printed thread is going to work well for optical type work - perhaps it's just clamping an optical unit in place where precision of the 'thread' and accuracy to other part geometries isn't critcal at all...

    It is also normal to decide the thread 'class of fit'... M42 x 1 -??

    Much of the 'fit' determination will come down to how accurate the 3D printing process yeilds a part.

    Can you let me know the outcome - thanks.

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  • Jes Consuegra

    Hi Tim,

    3D printing has evolved a lot in the past years. I use FDM (melted plastic) and I get enough precission. My printers are cartesian ones, I can print at a layer resolution of 0.1mm with nozzles that range between 0.2 and 0.5mm. I can use a variety of materials, (PLA, ABS, ASA, Nylon, PETG, HIPS, etc, even carbon fiber reinforced ones). a 1mm pitch thread takes 10 plastic layers, good enough to screw on the lens mounts with precission. A well calibrated 3D printer can get very fine parts.

    If you need further resolution, there is another technology  based on UV cured resins. Printers of that kind are more expensive.

    M39 and M42 are standard mount sizes for lenses built in the 1960~1980 years. Kind of a standard. Leica film cameras had the M39 screw on them, lenses having the male thread.

    As an example, here you have an adapter I made in 2017 (my early 3D printing times) with a simple M Prime One printer built by myself. This is for a Pentacon 80 lens, a projection lens that does not have any mount (it's a plain tube that fits inside the projector). I used a commercial M39 to micro4/3 adapter on the camera and printed a M39 thread on the extreme of the tube that hold the lens:

    It is quite precise, pictures are taken focusing manually. The lenght of the adapter was choosen experimentally, having the image covering the full area on the camera sensor. I do prefer the old lenses because they were made of glass whilst modern ones are made using polycarbonate. Older give a more pleasant colouring (to me) and stronger personality.

    A sample taken with the above adapter:

    No doubt that a lathe would provide finer and stronger parts, but the 3D printing allow a short time between the idea and having a prototype.

    Among the parts I've been designing, a support to replace one of the broken legs for the radiator of a BMW bike, printed in carbon fiber reinforced plastic, Still in place and working well. It took one day from the design to the part. The BMW people told him to replace the whole radiator ensemble, with this solution we saved a lot of time and money.

    Now I'm trying to learn DS Mechanical, much more powerful that the tools I'm used to (FreeCAD and OpenSCAD).

    And it's not easy... ;O)

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  • Jes Consuegra

    (To be honest,1mm threads are the smallest I can print reliably. I tried 0.5mm but 5 layer per thread were not enough.

     

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  • Tim Heeney

    Hi Jes.

    Learning DSM does take some time - initially, WOW , that's fast and the sectional dragging / advanced ( set in settings) automatic revolving etc is just a pure joy- master it! It's a must for tubes within tubes and generally anything that might be considered as 'internal details' etc.

    It's been a good 6 months now and i'm still learning the odd trick and still scratching my head at times to, there are certain modifications that can only be done on a section plane that have nothing to do with section planes at all !

    So, if really stuck - please ask...

     

    ps, I've used a Nikkor printing lens in a projection project - phenominal resolution and colour.

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  • Jacant

    I was bored with nothing to do on a lazy Sunday.

    M39 M42 file here.

    https://we.tl/t-XifhtNBbID 

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  • Jes Consuegra

    Tim, Thanks for your comments, you are right. Catching all the details is time consuming. I've spent a few hours trying to figure out how to draw a pullable circle on top of a cylinder. In FreeCAD you select a face and sketch on it, after that you can extrude the sketch.

    DS Mechanical seems to ask to define a plane for a sketch to be pullable.

    Well, I should use the old aphorism that says "when everything fails, read the manual". luckily nowadays we have Youtube, there are tons of good tutorials there, Specially there is a guy called Jim Taylor that has done a lot of very nice tutorials. But I get lost from time to time missing some important detail. Anyway that's the learning curve, steep at the beginning.

    BTW, many Nikkor lenses are superb. I use enlarger lenses behind a bellows for macro photography, impressive results..

     

     

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  • Jes Consuegra

    Wow Jacant!! Thanks a lot! You made my day :O)

    I had a very busy Sunday, a friend of mine is helping me in building what is locally called  a "dry stone wall" in the garden, (building walls by stacking rocks without any kind of mortar, just the stones alone). My friend is a passionate of this kind of building. 

    I can tell you it's not boring at all, choosing and matching rocks to solidly fit together. It's 5 meters long and has to be 1,5 meters high, (we have reached half the way, this has been the second session). Next round in two weeks, in the meantime I'll have time to learn more DS Mechanical. And for sure I'll be trying your nice model right now. It will save me a lot of headaches :0)

    Again, many thanks!

    Jes.

     

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  • Jes Consuegra

    First extension tube with your models:

    Already sliced and ready to print, estimated print time 1.15 hours. (will do in the morning).

     

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  • Jes Consuegra

    Printed (after one failed attempt due to a power loss - I live in the country-).

    The outer thread fits perfectly in the camera. The inner one fits too tight, I must check tolerancies.

    Again, Thanks Jacant!!

     

    This extension tube will shorten the minimum focusing distance of the lens put on it, in my case a Jupiter-8 50mm lens that has a close focus distance of 1 meter, and will (hopefully, if my estimation is correct) allow me to focus as close as 20 cm so I could take close ups with the same lens.

     

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  • Tim Heeney

    Hi Jes - gotta say thanks!

     

    I'm begining to see great valve in having a 3d printer - the number of things that get tossed away just because of a broken plastic component!

    hmm...

     

    ps - add some scallops or ribs around the lens periphery...blimey, all that 'flash' and cosmetic niceties comes almost free!

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  • Jes Consuegra

    Hi Tim,

    Yes it is!. At first one trends to solve everything with plastic, but once the initial euphoria ends, one usually finds a good balance between machining and creating plastic parts.

    I began my 3D experience just because what you say: one broken pipe entry in my water decalcifier, no available spare parts. Then I started modelling it with TinkerCAD, got it sliced with a program called CURA and went to the Barcelona's FabCafe who printed the part for me. It cost me an arm and a leg, but got the part and could repair the decalcifier (I still keep the old broken part as a reminder). I thought that for the cost of 10 printed parts I could afford to build a printer. Went to the RepRap site, got the plans for a Powercode printer and started building it. Was a nice and challenging process. At the end I've built five printers (not all of them are working now) and 3D printing is a common part of my small workshop. 

    Yes, you are right. Bells and whistles doesn't cost very much. Just plastic (that is cheap by now) and time... That is the only restriction. A small part like this adapter takes one hour and a half to be printed. I've printed parts that took many hours to print. So at first I always print the basic shape without any ornament and once it is working I add the cosmetic part. Just for the time spent. In this case, the adapter will be probably longer, but since the body doesn't affect at all, I cut it the minimum, just the size needed to joint both threads. Also I use recycled plastic for it, cheaper (odd colour) and in a cheap plastic (PLA or PETG). At the end it will be printed in either ASA or ABS (or maybe in PETG if it's strong enough to cope with the weight of the lenses) and in matte black colour. 

    Nowadays there are lots of free models around the internet, you can get them for free at places like Thingiverse.com ot Youmagine.com. People use to put their designs there to share. Most of the 3D printing technology is Open Source.

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  • Tim Heeney

    Jes...right, i gotta get moving on this...Cheers.

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  • Jacant

    The outer thread fits perfectly in the camera. The inner one fits too tight,

    I have redrawn the nuts to the 'Max' settings.

    File here https://we.tl/t-aVYVdI6Koq 

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  • Jes Consuegra

    Wow Jacant, you are overhelming me...!!

    Thanks a lot!!. I'll try again with these!.

    Kind regards,

    Jes.

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  • Jes Consuegra

    Well, second try ready to print :O)

    Estimated 1h 30' so in practice will be around 2h...

    This one is a bit taller, so the increase in time.

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  • Jes Consuegra

    Perfect fit this time, thanks a lot Jacant!!

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  • Sara Tim

    You just have to open Albany County Fasteners.

    Then you have to select Screws and Bolts. And then you have to select the type you are looking for.

    Then you have to select whether you are looking for Imperial or Metric and select the option of your choice.

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