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Working with threads

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18 commentaires

  • Jacant

    Select all of the 'Faces' of the thread and use the 'Fill' tool. This should make the inside of where the thread was smooth, this can now be 'Pulled' to the correct diameter.

    Another ways is to keep the 'Thread' part of the model by placing a 'Plane' on the adjoining flat part and use the Combine/Cut tool to separate the thread from the model. A new 'cylinder can now be formed with the correct size thread. The original thread can be copied and pasted into a new drawing and saved as an 'M8 thread' for future use.

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  • Robert Tamer

    Does Design Spark not have a history of everything I do so I can just go back to that point and delete the threads?

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  • Jacant

    DesignSpark is not 'Parametric' it is a 'Solid Dynamic Modeler'.

    That said, there is the 'Undo' option that can be set in File - DSM Options - Advanced - Maximum undo steps. This will only work in the current open drawing. Once saved and closed all of the undo steps are deleted.

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  • Robert Tamer

    Yep, that's what I thought.  I tried what you said before, but I received a message that the operation failed.  Anymore ideas that I may try?

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  • Robert Tamer

    Is there any way I can make the threads a component in itself, and still cut into another component?

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  • Jacant

    Draw a 'Circle' on the end of the thread (bigger than the thread) and use it to 'Pull Cut' into the solid. This should delete the thread. Pull sides to correct diameter.

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  • Jacant

    The 'Thread' is a part of the solid so cannot be made into a Component. It can be done if you did as I suggested. Cut the thread with the surrounding cylinder from the solid. Save this as it's own file and 'Import' it when needed. Be aware of 'Internal' and 'External' Components. Look in the help file. F1. If you just use a component that was imported and change anything about it. The 'original' file will be updated with any changes. To overcome this once opened select 'Use internal Copy'

    Once you have done this there is an option to 'Change Component'  that sounds like exactly what you want.

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  • Jacant

    ...I tried what you said before, but I received a message that the operation failed...

    Most probably because you did not select all of the faces that made up the thread.

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  • Tim Heeney

    So, when modeling a thread, what you are doing is making a couple of helix spline surfaces - the software doesn't know it as a 'thread' of any kind.

    You should be able to delete all the thread quite easily...it's dinner time. I'll come back later tonight with more info / advice.

    DSM add-on Drawing Module has a thread tool - however it does not make or change the actual geometry - what it does is visually add the thread minor / major lines on thread ends (plan views of threads) and in axial section views through threads. Standard and custom threads can be specifies. Cosmetic images of threads can be added to pictorially show a thread. But this doesn't help you...let me come back later...

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  • Robert Tamer

    I really appreciate the help.  Waiting for you to return.

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  • Tim Heeney

    Robert.

    For you, because you like modeling up the cut thread ( i quite like to see the actual thread as well ;) ), and because you're a machinest with your preferred way to finish a thread i.e, running into a groove of size ? i think it might be a good idea to invest some time making small files with just the internal thread and hole, as a solid volume , for easy volume removals using the combine tool. I also envisage you have particular preferred tools to use - so why not model and reuse the consistent features you use.

    I'm working on a parametric sketch approach that makes the thread creation as easy as it can be in DSM - sadly we don't have variables...more later.

    This way, the modeling results are always consistant.

    As Jacant has said, the process is to make a thread ( Thread and hole of preferred simplicity /complexity ) component, name it say M12 Internal x 1.25, file it away for future use...when needed again, Insert it (using Insert File) but if wanting to modify it slightly for the current design, you must upon inserting it , select it from Structure Browser with the RMB ( right mouse button) >source >Use 'Internal copy' ( if you don't do this the master reference file will get altered).

    If no alterations are needed, i'd not bother with making an Internal Copy - just use the 'Keep Cutter' option in the combine command, then delete the inserted file afterwards. The master ref file remains intact.

     

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  • Tim Heeney

    Just for a bit of minor interest.

    Here's an internal blind thread and the drawing to with the usual thread convention.

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  • Robert Tamer

    Tim Heeney

    I tried what you mentioned.  Making plugs with the threads already cut.  I made, for example a cylinder with a diameter of 12mm x 50mm.  I then made a set with threading from M10 to M6.  I can cut the plug to the length needed by putting a plane on the depth I need, and split the body.  It seems to work, just a bit cumbersome.

     

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  • Robert Tamer

    Tim Heeney

    Here some photos of what I did.  This is the part I need threaded.

    Made and threaded a cylinder.  Cut it length by applying a plane where I needed it.

    Split the body, and deleted what I didn't need.

    Import the new file.

    Using the move command, and anchor, placed it where I needed.

    As a new component, I can also delete it to change the size, and/or depth of the threads.  Like I said before, a bit time consuming, but it does work.

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  • Robert Tamer

    Tim Heeney

    As long as I'm asking questions...

    You're using the constraint menu.  So where did they hide the polygon tool?  Couldn't find it, so I had to switch back.  Thank you in advance.

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  • Tim Heeney

    Robert,

    I see you're ticking along nicely with DSM.

    There isn't yet a polygon tool in V5 Constraint Sketcher but will be in the next version.

    So i use the Constraint sketcher to now make my hole patterns.

    I made a file with just a sketch in it. Every time i open it i get the constrained sketch so i can amend it to my desire. Then upon closing the sketch, select the face / faces and copy to clipboard ( Ctrl c ) . Tab to the new design file, select the face where to paste and Ctrl v to paste - position as desired.

    Attempting to make patterns of hex holes in the conventional way, X dir, then Y dir i find it's very data hungry and slow to manipulate or change the design.

    This way, size and spacing is important when punching holes in plates to accommodate thickness, also altering corner strengtheners as well with the square holes example.

    The constraint sketcher takes some practice, but it's worthwhile.

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  • Robert Tamer

    Tim Heeney

    I was using Fusion for years, but they kept cutting options and things that I was using.  I really liked their CAM, but they kept taking things, and soon that went also.  Making the jump from Fusion to DSM was a bit rough at the beginning, but as you said, I am finding my way in the dark.  I use a program from Vectric, and it has it's own CAM, but with Fusion I thought I finally had a program that was complete for the CNC and 3DPrinting.  I was wrong.

    I set up DSM on my laptop to get used to working with the constraints menu, but left it as is on my PC.  I do alot of work with hex heads and holes when 3DPrinting, and it's just faster at the moment.

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  • Tim Heeney

    DSM fits my desires very nicely and i like the dynamic approach to designing 'as i see fit' ( haha) on the fly etc - as i find it easier to go forward with what i see / have, than to delve backwards and bounching (non-recorded) ideas off various bits of assembled parts is my design nirvana.

    I owned a mid sized VMC (16 ATC, 10K 30m rapids Mitsubishi Spline controller) and used OneCnc to cut a few parts - as a commercial enterprise it was suicide by a thousand cuts. I came from almost no manual machining and learnt the lot. The machine was dumped at the factory and i just got on with it...phew ! Of course there were accidents, damage and so much  £££ cost everywhere - i learnt how to make / adjust to a few microns consistently and all that it entails. i learnt it was a very tough job, that i could do to a high standard, but by far, best done by others...

     

     

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