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virtually combine two solids

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8 comments

  • Tim Heeney

    Nils.

    This may not answer your question re 'virtual bodies'.

    Make individual bit's, use body/components and superior owning component ( owning collections of other components i.e parent child ownerships ), do all the shuffling around etc, then when finished, combine it all together and export .stl.

    Each letter could be a separate Body, so very easy spacing. Whole words could be a Component which own the body letters.

    The part to which the words / letter attach - i'd position it to be in the part structure either superior or an equal level component to the word components.

    Using Combine ( either adding or subtracting ) would make all the individual parts into a single solid for .stl files.

    Or, make the parts / component structure the least complicated way you're comfortable with as below image.

    Does this help ?

    If text is combined to the part, personally, i find by adding the selection of 'Protrusion' or 'Depression', manipulations are still fairly quick.

    Lots of options with DSM  !

     

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  • Jacant

    I would Combine the two solids for STL export.

    There is not a problem to move the text or an individual letter. Select the text or individual letter, (make sure you select all of the 'surfaces' that make up the text or individual letter) and just 'Move' them.

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  • Nils Rottgardt

    Thanks, that answered my question.

    I actually combined it only before print and as it is fine now I combined it also in DSM finally. But in general...how you made a complex part based on separate solids in DSM or is it not common? Or is it common that one basic parts owns one solid only? I also take a look into FreeCAD and there it is working more like to combine the things virtually. In the example projects I found both variants...but perhaps the combining requerement is important for 3D printing only.

    DSM Structure:

    Case -->

    --> Upper Case -> Solid
    --> Bottom Case -> Solid

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  • Tim Heeney

    It all depends upon the suituation.

    DSM and FreeCad may be used to model single complex designs  or designs of multiple parts.

    Solids, surfaces, curves, planes etc may either exist as single entities requiring single or box or colour etc etc selection techniques. For designs of more than one part and a file consisting of many bits as mentioned above, or importing other parts, etc it is advantageous to use Components in a part structure.

    Splitting up designs into components allows that component to be opened and saved independently to a single file and also the possibility of versioning that component only. Also the possibility of loading a lightweight version of it keeping the file data size quite small.

    I hope this explains a little why a component is made.

     

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  • Tim Heeney

    Nils.

    What this youtube guy does always quite impresses me...He almost never uses components !

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BTDXSR1rA80&lc=UgyzVyFZLZ3BbPABIRB4AaABAg.9DPGFelfovg9DQK8EMJdhW

    Have a peek through his videos - some very clever stuff there...

    OF NOTE in the above youtube are the creation methods - i think especially the work to create symmetrical features ( many would call these 'mirrored' !) which are more common and practical than making 'Mirrored Parts'. Watch how solid cylinders and faces copied are utilised to quickly design and also edges copied for face sub-division - A very inventive user....

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  • Jacant

    It is always best to Combine solids into one for 3D printing. You can however have multiple solids, so long as they are at least touching, preferably slightly overlapped. This is because an STL file is an approximation of the outside surface of your model, split up into facets and again split up into triangles with a 'Normal'. A good 'Slicer' program like Ultimaker Cura will 'Join' the solids together to get the overall outside surface and ignore all of the internal geometry and overlapping faces. (if they are slightly overlapping). If they are only just touching then you may have problems, as each 'touching' surface has the coordinates of the face plus a 'Normal' to tell the software which is inside and which is out. When two triangles touch, the software has the problem to decide what triangle is 'Outside' and may 'Delete' the other triangle to achieve this. Then you may be left with a 'Hole' and the software will automatically 'Fill' this hole. Sometimes with results that you do not want.

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  • Nils Rottgardt

    Many thanks for this helpful discussion. Understand a littlte better also the different needs between normal 3D design and 3d printing with a slicer.

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  • Milan

    +1 thanks for these explanations!

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